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Thai Fried Wonton Recipe (Kiew Tod)

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Thai fried wonton recipe, hands down, THE BEST kiew tod you’ll ever make at home. These crispy snacks are incredibly easy to make once you get the hang of folding them. They’re so crunchy and irresistibly delicious!

Thai fried wonton, kiew tod, served with chili sauce.

Pair these with my spicy wonton dipping sauce for a taste of classic Thai street food at home.

If you love steamed, boiled, and fried snacks, you’ll want to try kanom jeeb, or Thai dumplings, and pork and shrimp wonton next.

What is fried wonton

Fried wonton is a popular Asian appetizer, beloved for its savory filling like ground pork or shrimp. Each filling is encased in a golden, crispy wrapper, and they’re often enjoyed as an appetizer or for making wonton soup.


Fried wontons are typically paired with dipping sauces and are a staple in both Chinese and Thai cuisine.

Kiew tod

A while ago, I had a wonderful chat with a street vendor in my village. He shared his secret for the best Thai wontons and dumplings, and he said it’s all about simplicity. He uses just pork as the filling to keep his stall profitable.

But since we’re making these at home, we have the freedom of using just pork or a combination of pork and shrimp.

By choosing the filling, you can turn these little snacks into a real crowd-pleaser. You can even make them in advance for your next party along with tod mun pla and kai tod – Thai fish cakes and fried chicken.

Close-up of Thai fried wontons with sweet chili dipping sauce.

The best part about them is that they freeze like a dream, making them perfect for meal prep. They’re one of the best make-ahead snacks and by making these in advance you’ll have more time to enjoy with your guests and family.

And hey, if you’re keeping these all for yourself, I’m not judging!

However you choose to enjoy them, don’t forget to pair your freshly fried kiew tod with some of my homemade dipping sauces, like this irresistible Thai sweet chili sauce.

Wonton wrappers

For your Thai fried wontons, it’s best to use wonton wrappers because they’re thinner and give you that perfect crispy bite. In Thailand, we have separate wrappers for boiling/steaming and for deep-frying.

Where to get them: You can find wonton wrappers at most grocery stores, in the refrigerated section near other Asian ingredients. They’re usually sold in packs, ready to use.

What are they: Wonton wrappers are thin sheets of dough made from flour, egg, and water. They’re typically used to create wontons and dumplings, filled with everything from meat to vegetables.

Dumpling wrappers are a bit thicker, but you can use those if that’s what you have on hand.

Ingredients

Ingredients can be sourced at Asian grocery stores and Asian markets.
The exact measurements are in the recipe card at the end of this post.


Ingredients for Thai fried wonton recipe: minced pork, coriander root, garlic, sesame oil, light soy sauce, wonton wrappers, white sugar, white pepper, and green onions.
  • Wonton wrappers – You can find these thin wrappers at Asian grocery stores and at Asian markets. They’re also available at some regular supermarkets.
  • Ground pork – Ground pork adds a juicy, meaty bite to the crispy fried wontons.
  • Light soy sauce – Enhances the savory notes in the pork and adds a rich flavor.
  • White pepper – Ground white pepper adds a gentle heat without overpowering the other flavors.
  • White sugar – A sprinkle of sugar is essential for balancing the flavors, which is an important part of Thai cooking.
  • Sesame oil – Sesame oil adds a rich, slightly nutty flavor.
  • Coriander root – Gives the pork a fresh, earthy note.
  • Green onions – Freshly chopped green onions add a crispiness and slight onion-like flavor.
  • Garlic – A key ingredient in Thai cuisine, garlic adds a pungent aroma and robust flavor.
  • Oil – Use an oil with high smoke point and neutral flavor suited for deep-frying, like canola oil or vegetable oil.

How to make Thai fried wonton

Garlic and coriander root being ground in stone mortar.

Step 1: Pound garlic and coriander root with a mortar and pestle.

Thai pork wonton filling mixture in a clear bowl.

Step 2: In a mixing bowl, combine ground pork, pounded garlic and coriander root, light soy, white pepper, white sugar, and sesame oil. Knead well until everything is well mixed. Then, add freshly chopped green onions and gently mix one more time.

Hand holding a wrapped wonton.

Step 3: Lay a wonton wrapper flat on your palm and place a teaspoon of the filling in the center. Moisten the edges with a dab of water – this acts like glue. Fold the wrapper diagonally to form a triangle, and press to seal the edges tightly. Repeat until you’re out of filling.

Wontons fried in a pan.

Step 4: Heat oil in a pan around 350°F (about 175°C) and fry your wontons. Avoid overcrowding your pan. Fry them until each one is golden and crispy, turning occasionally. Make sure the filling is cooked, they’ll float to the top once ready. After frying, let them drain on paper towels before serving. Enjoy!

Kitchen tools

  • Small spoon for portioning the filling into the wonton wrappers
  • Small bowl of water to wet the edges of the wonton wrappers
  • Cutting board and a sharp knife for chopping green onions
  • Spider strainer to remove the wontons from the hot oil
  • Mortar and pestle or food processor for mixing spices
  • Large skillet or deep wok for frying the wontons
  • Mixing bowl to mix the wonton filling
  • Paper towels for draining excess oil
  • Measuring spoons and cups

How to fold a wonton

Folding wontons is easier than you think, here is an easy step-by-step guide:

Instructional images for folding wontons.
  1. Place a teaspoon of your filling in the center of a wonton wrapper.
  2. Dip your finger in water and moisten the edges of the wrapper; the water acts as a glue.
  3. Fold the wrapper in half to form a triangle, pressing the edges together to seal your filling inside.

Tips for frying wontons

Prevent them from drying: To keep wonton wrappers moist and pliable, cover them with a damp cloth both before and after you’ve filled them.

Oil temperature: The ideal oil temperature for frying wontons is around 350°F (about 175°C). If your oil is too hot, the wontons can burn. If it’s too cold, your wontons will absorb too much grease.

Make ahead: You can make the filling up to a day or two before using it.

Vegetables: You can add button mushrooms, cabbage, carrots, mushrooms, water chestnuts, shiitake mushrooms.

Flavorings: Feel free to season the filling to your taste with oyster sauce, fish sauce, black pepper, etc.

Proteins: Ground pork and shrimp are traditional Thai fillings. You can substitute other types of ground meat like turkey, beef, and even fish, but I recommend sticking to the traditional options.

Folding: You can use the triangle shape I used, or get creative and make your own shapes. Find out 3 fun ways to fold wontons!

How to serve

Before serving, drain them on paper towels to remove any excess oil. Serve them with a dipping sauce of your choice, and optionally garnish with freshly chopped green onions for color. They’re the perfect finger food for your next party!

Dipping sauces

Here is a list of dipping sauces for fried wontons:

How to store and reheat

Let your deep-fried wontons cool to room temperature, then place in an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Reheating: In the oven, preheat to 350°F (175°C) and heat wontons on a baking sheet for 5-10 minutes. For deep-frying, re-fry briefly in hot oil until crisp.

Make ahead

Refrigerate: Keep uncooked wontons in the fridge for up to 2 days before frying.

Freeze: Freeze uncooked wontons for up to 2 months.

You can fry wontons straight from frozen, which saves time and avoids the need for thawing. When frying them frozen, just give them a little more time in the hot oil to ensure they cook through evenly and turn perfectly crispy. Just remember to not overcrowd your frying pan.

Frequently asked questions

Are wonton wrappers gluten-free?

No, wonton wrappers are typically not gluten-free as they are made from wheat flour, which contains gluten.

Can I make wontons with an air fryer?

To air fry wontons, brush both sides with oil and air fry at 350°F (175°C) for about 10 minutes, until they turn golden brown and crispy, flipping them halfway. Ensure the wontons are in a single layer in the air fryer basket for even cooking.

Authentic Thai appetizer recipes

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Thai Fried Wonton Recipe (Kiew Tod)

Thai fried wonton, kiew tod, served with chili sauce.
The best Thai fried wonton recipe for delicious kiew tod at home! Pair with one of my many dipping sauces.
Praew
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Cuisine Thai
Course Appetizer, Snack
Serving Size 5 people

Ingredients

  • 1 package of wonton wrappers
  • 8.8 ounces minced pork
  • 1 tablespoon light soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 teaspoon white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 coriander root
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons green onions finely chopped

Instructions

  • Pound garlic and coriander root with a mortar and pestle.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine ground pork, pounded garlic and coriander root, light soy, white pepper, white sugar, and sesame oil. Knead well until everything is well mixed. Then, add freshly chopped green onions and gently mix one more time.
  • Lay a wonton wrapper flat on your palm and place a teaspoon of the filling in the center. Moisten the edges with a dab of water – this acts like glue. Fold the wrapper diagonally to form a triangle, and press to seal the edges tightly. Repeat until you’re out of filling.
  • Heat oil in a pan around 350°F (about 175°C) and fry your wontons. Avoid overcrowding your pan. Fry them until each one is golden and crispy, turning occasionally. Make sure the filling is cooked, they’ll float to the top once ready. After frying, let them drain on paper towels before serving. Enjoy!

Notes

  • Use the nutrition card in this recipe as a guideline.
  • Wonton wrappers: I used 35 wrappers, so you'll have more than enough with 1 package, and you can freeze the rest.

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