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Pork Gyoza Recipe (Pork Dumplings)

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This pork gyoza recipe with homemade wrappers is easy and perfect for weekend days. You can make a batch of these pork dumplings in advance, keep them in the freezer, and then simply pan-fry and steam them from frozen to save time when you’re hosting a party.

Gyoza fried in a pan.

Dumplings are incredibly popular in Asia, and every region has its favorites.

In Thailand, kanom jeeb from local street vendors is beloved by everyone. You’ve got pork and shrimp wonton and garlic chive dumplings – both are so delicious. In Japan, gyoza has won the hearts of the people, which is their version of jiaozi, Chinese pot stickers.

Today, we’re trying Japanese cuisine with this gyoza recipe made entirely from scratch, using homemade gyoza wrappers. And I have lots of dipping sauce options coming up later, including a classic wonton dipping sauce.

What is gyoza

Gyoza are Japanese dumplings filled with savory ground pork and vegetables. Traditionally, they’re pan-fried to create a crispy bottom, then steamed to achieve a tender top. Gyoza originated from the Chinese jiaozi and were later adapted in Japan.


The special two-step cooking process is what makes Japanese gyoza stand out – first, they’re pan-fried, and then steamed. We call them gyoza, but they’re a type of dumpling.

Gyoza vs dumplings

Gyoza are a type of dumpling, but not every dumpling is gyoza. Let me explain!

  • Gyoza is the term for Japanese pan-fried dumplings. They use thin gyoza wrappers, which are typically thinner than most dumpling wrappers. Inside, you usually find a tasty mix of pork and vegetables, spiced up with garlic, ginger, and soy sauce.
  • Dumplings can be found all around the world, in lots of variations, shapes, and flavors. For example, China has Jiaozi and dim sum, and Korea has mandu.
Dusted gyoza wrappers on a bamboo surface.
Thin gyoza wrappers, ready for making Japanese dumplings.

So, basically, gyoza is a kind of Japanese dumpling, known for its thin wrapper and specific way of cooking. Dumplings are just the general name for all these Asian snacks, no matter where they’re from.

Pork dumplings

These are some of the best Asian dumplings I’ve ever had, and I’m not kidding! They have an irresistibly juicy pork filling that’s just perfect with that crunchy cabbage and the kick of ginger.

For this recipe, you can go with the traditional two-cook method, where you first pan-fry them to get a crispy bottom and then steam to make them soft on top. For an easier way, you can just boil or deep-fry them to get them soft or crisp all the way.

Uncooked gyoza dumplings.

If you’re new to making gyoza, don’t worry. This recipe comes with easy instructions and step-by-step images. And making these pork dumplings is a fun way to spend some family time with the kids in your kitchen!

Feel free to mix up the filling, I’ve got some tasty variations coming up after the instructions. And if you end up making too many, no problem! They freeze like a dream, so you can enjoy homemade dumplings any time you want with just a bit of prep ahead.

Ingredients

Ingredients can be sourced at Asian grocery stores and Asian markets.
The exact measurements are in the recipe card at the end of this post.


Ingredients for pork gyoza labeled: ground pork, garlic chives, garlic, ginger, white cabbage, sesame oil, cornstarch, shoyu soy sauce, and white pepper.
  • Minced pork – With a filling of minced pork, this Japanese dumplings recipe is deliciously savory and meaty.
  • Cornstarch – Helps make the gyoza filling sticky and binds everything together, so your dumplings don’t fall apart when cooking.
  • Chinese cabbage – Adds a crunchy texture to the filling.
  • Garlic chives – Garlic chives have a fresh onion-like, garlicky flavor. Green onions can be used as a substitute if you don’t like the dinstinct flavor of garlic chives.
  • Ginger – Ginger adds a warm, peppery kick to the filling.
  • Garlic – Infuses the pork filling with aroma and delicious garlic flavor.
  • Shoyu soy sauce – Shoyu is the term for Japanese style soy sauces. You can find such soy sauces, like Kikkoman, in an Asian grocery store and Asian markets.
  • White pepper – Adds a subtle, earthy heat that doesn’t overpower the other flavors.
  • Sesame oil – Adds a unique nutty flavor to the filling.
  • Gyoza wrappers – You can make this gyoza recipe from scratch with my easy gyoza wrappers recipe. They’re fresh and perfect for making ahead of time! If you’re short on time, a store-bought version works just as good. Either way, these Japanese dumplings are a total hit.

Cooking instructions

Prepare the filling

Minced pork in a clear bowl.

Step 1: Knead ground pork with white pepper, sesame oil, choyu soy sauce, and cornstarch in a mixing bowl until it gets a sticky texture, about 2–3 minutes.

Gyoza filling a clear bowl.

Step 2: Mix in shredded cabbage, minced garlic, chopped garlic chives, and shredded ginger.

How to fold gyoza

Hand holding gyoza wrapper.

Step 1: Lay the gyoza wrapper flat in your hand.

Hand holding gyoza wrapper with pork filling.

Step 2: Spoon a tablespoon of filling in the center of the wrapper.

Moistening edges of a gyoza wrapper with pork filling.

Step 3: Dip your finger in water and trace around the edge of the wrapper.

Hands holding a pleated gyoza dumpling.

Step 4: Fold the edges together. Then, make a series of small folds or pleats along the edge, pinching firmly as you go.

Hand shaping pleated dumpling.

Step 5: Ensure the final pleat is pressed tight and make sure your pleated dumpling is well-sealed by firmly pressing the edges together.

Pan-fry and steam

Gyoza fried in a pan.

Step 1: Add a thin layer of oil (about 3–4 tablespoons) to a non-stick pan over medium heat. Once hot, place your gyoza in the pan, flat side down. Let them sizzle until the bottom side is golden and crispy.

Steaming gyoza in a skillet.

Step 2: Then, pour in enough water to cover the bottom of the pan, but don’t submerge the gyoza, and cover with a lid. Let them steam for another 3 to 4 minutes, or until the water has evaporated. Remove the lid and allow the gyoza to cook for another minute or so, to crisp up the bottom once more. Serve immediately with your favorite dipping sauce. Enjoy!

Kitchenware

  • Rolling pin and sharp round object for making homemade wrappers
  • Small bowl of water to wet the edges of the gyoza wrappers
  • Non-stick pan / cast iron skillet with lid
  • Tongs for handling the cooked gyoza
  • Chopping board and a sharp knife
  • Mixing bowl for mixing the filling
  • Tablespoon to portion the filling
  • Measuring spoons and cups

Pork gyoza tips and tricks

Cover the wrappers: Keep your gyoza wrappers covered with a damp cloth or paper towel while you’re working. This stops them from drying out. Also make sure to cover your finished gyoza.

Don’t overcrowd: When pan-frying, make sure you don’t overcrowd the pan, as this will lead to steaming instead of frying.

Don’t overfill: Avoid overfilling your gyoza to ensure they seal properly.

Seal tightly: Make sure your gyoza are sealed tightly to prevent them from opening.

Japanese dumpling filling variations

Vegetable gyoza: For meat-free dumplings, use a mix of finely chopped mushrooms, carrots, and tofu.

Proteins: You can swap the ground pork for other meat to make different kind of dumplings, like chicken gyoza, beef gyoza, and shrimp gyoza.

Gyoza dipping sauce

These Japanese dumplings pair perfectly with this wonton dipping sauce. Made with vinegar, dark soy, sugar, and chilies, it’s a sweet, savory, and spicy sauce that’s versatile and easy to make.

Gyoza dipping sauce with dumplings.

You can also try pairing it with Thai hot sauce and Thai sweet chili sauce.

Storing and make ahead tips

You can prep these in advance and store them for later. Here’s how:

Storing uncooked gyoza: Once you’ve made your gyoza, place them on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, with space in between so they don’t stick. Wrap the tray and keep it in the fridge for up to a day. For keeping them longer, freeze them instead.

Storing cooked gyoza: Let your leftovers cool down to room temperature and transfer them into an airtight container. They’ll stay fresh in the fridge for up to two days. Reheat them in a pan with a little bit of oil to bring back the crispiness.

Freezing: For uncooked, place gyoza on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper in the freezer until they are individually frozen. Then, transfer them to a freezer bag or container.

Thawing: There’s no need to thaw frozen gyoza before cooking. Whether they’re cooked or uncooked, you can cook or reheat them straight from the freezer. Remember to adjust the cooking time accordingly.

Frequently asked questions

Is gyoza gluten-free?

No, the wrappers are typically not gluten-free, and the filling is often seasoned with soy sauce.

What are gyoza made of?

Gyoza are filled with ground meat and vegetables, wrapped in a thin dough that’s made from flour, salt, and water.

What to eat with gyoza?

You can eat gyoza with rice, dipping sauces, more appetizers, or a side of fresh vegetables.

Asian appetizer recipes

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Pork Gyoza Recipe (Pork Dumplings)

Pork gyoza with sauce on a traditional bamboo-woven dish.
The best pork gyoza recipe for delicious Japanese pork dumplings with homemade wrappers or store-bought! This recipe yields about 35 delicious gyoza dumplings.
Praew
Prep Time 40 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Cuisine Thai
Course Appetizer, Snack
Serving Size 7 people

Ingredients

  • 10.5 ounces ground pork
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2.5 tablespoons shoyu soy sauce see notes
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1.5 cup Chinese cabbage finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon ginger grated
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1/4 cup garlic chives finely chopped
  • 35 gyoza wrappers see notes

Instructions

PREPARE THE FILLING

  • Knead ground pork with white pepper, sesame oil, choyu soy sauce, and cornstarch in a mixing bowl until it gets a sticky texture, about 2–3 minutes.
  • Mix in shredded cabbage, minced garlic, chopped garlic chives, and shredded ginger.

HOW TO FOLD GYOZA

  • Lay the gyoza wrapper flat in your hand.
  • Spoon a tablespoon of filling in the center of the wrapper.
  • Dip your finger in water and trace around the edge of the wrapper.
  • Fold the edges together. Then, make a series of small folds or pleats along the edge, pinching firmly as you go.
  • Ensure the final pleat is pressed tight and make sure your pleated dumpling is well-sealed by firmly pressing the edges together.

PAN-FRY AND STEAM

  • Add a thin layer of oil (about 3–4 tablespoons) to a non-stick pan over medium heat. Once hot, place your gyoza in the pan, flat side down. Let them sizzle until the bottom side is golden and crispy.
  • Then, pour in enough water to cover the bottom of the pan, but don’t submerge the gyoza, and cover with a lid. Let them steam for another 3 to 4 minutes, or until the water has evaporated. Remove the lid and allow the gyoza to cook for another minute or so, to crisp up the bottom once more. Serve immediately with your favorite dipping sauce. Enjoy!

Notes

  • Use the nutrition card in this recipe as a guideline.
  • Shoyu - Shoyu is the term for Japenese style soy sauces. You can find such sauces, like Kikkoman, in an Asian grocery store and Asian markets.
  • Gyoza wrappers - Use my gyoza wrappers recipe or opt for store-bought. I made 35 gyoza dumplings with these ingredients.

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